Jane Austen: A New Revelation

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Available in shop from just two hours, subject to availability. Cassandra also destroyed 90 per cent of Jane Austen's letters to expunge any evidence of Eliza's authorship. However, she was not clever enough to destroy the letter of 29 January which is the "smoking gun" which proves Eliza's authorship of the novels. Published in , not , by what appears to be a now-dissolved Manchester company. Formidable bibliography. The title on the jacket is hard to discern from the cover painting; possibly intentionally - the hardback itself has clear gold lettering on red.

The computer typesetting allows free use of italics, and bold characters - useful in examining dedications and epitaphs, though the indexing style for my taste is subtly wrong, indenting the wrong way round. In fact, not inappropriately, the name 'de Feullide, Eliza' is somewhat hidden. Nicholas Ennos studied modern languages and allows himself a scathing paragraph on the absurdly low standard of language teaching in Britain - I hope he's wrong, but fear he's right.

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He has competence in Latin a chapter compares Tacitus's style with, for example, Goldsmith's History of England , pilloried by the real author. The book is arranged, in my view very well, in bite-size chapters, somewhat independent of each other; perhaps he wrote his book in folders of topics. Where there is repetition, it's because of this structure. The single long chapter is 4 The Life of Eliza Hancock, which includes a marriage to a French "comte", who, though wealthy, was not all that wealthy, and seemed to have his eye on her money, with which to improve a beautiful but remote and boggy part of France.

Mr Hancock may have been infertile; Warren Hastings being suggested, with evidence, as the father.

Jane Austen - A New Revelation

Ennos has difficulties with Hastings' character, not surprisingly, of course. My personal best guess is that Jews profited from the opium 'trade', and offloaded as much as possible of the opprobrium onto British officials, including of course Hastings. Ennos qualified as a solicitor has a good eye for trustees, marriage laws, baronetcies as a royal money-maker, tax evasion by Warren Hastings, wills.

Unfortunately Eliza is not illustrated copyright reasons , but represented only by her grave slab St John at Hampstead, though 'Wikipedia' doesn't list her as someone of interest. The sections on destruction of letters, largely by Cassandra, remind me of the destruction of Alfred Russel Wallace's letters to Darwin. Nicholas Ennos has in effect three introductions, the third outlining his reasons for investigating Jane Austen in italics.

Musing over some online writings by Miles W Mathis, on New York hotels and landowners and the aristocracies of England and Scotland as transposed into the Americas, it occurred to me that without Eliza's bastardy, her literary works would not have existed; and we would have as little idea of the realities of the lives of such people as American 'Janeites' do now. My guess is that Ennos will become as well-known as Thomas Looney, of de Vere fame. But path-breaking is difficult. I wonder if Ennos means it. My only reservation, which perhaps would not interest many people, is the greater world: and the Rothschild money grab was bang in the middle of the Jane Austen novels, and might have been considered important.

RW 30 Dec The idea that Jane Austen may have been poisoned with arsenic surfaced in or was popularised then. Ennos's book does not consider the idea. However, he has an online comment posted after his book was published: Jane Austen's cousin, and sister in law, Eliza de Feuilide, was the author of the novels and not Jane, as I prove in my book "Jane Austen - a New Revelation". But one Jane Austen mystery is why Hampshire hardly figures in her novels.

Conversely, the author knew Surrey well and here she set one unpublished novel, The Watsons, and of course her masterpiece, Emma. Lady Sophia connects Surrey to Jane Austen.

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Another Jane Austen mystery is that many places in the novels correspond exactly to places. The heroine of Emma lives in a mansion called Hartfield on the edge of a town called Highbury. For the author, Surrey was the ideal English county. In Emma she famously describes the ideal English view:.

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